Julebyen 2022

Saturday Dec. 3 (9-4) & Sunday Dec. 4 (10-3)
Knife River, Minnesota

TROLL VILLAGE

Troll Village is located next to the Knife River Train Depot. It features a food vendor, Scandinavian jewelry in the Depot and a fire pit surrounded by Adirondak chairs.

Historic Train Depot


The Knife River Train Depot

Due to the tireless efforts of local volunteers and under the auspices of the Knife River Heritage and Cultural Center, the village train depot has been fully restored back to how it was in 1900!

The depot is within Troll Village and is open for inspection during Julebyen. No admission charge.



Vendors and Activities

Koselig Design

I live in Duluth, MN and have been making Sami-inspired bracelets since I was 12 years old and love sharing the beauty of this art. Rich in history from Northern Scandinavia, the creation of Sami-inspired & Salmon Leather bracelets and earrings is an heirloom art and family tradition. I will also be demonstrating technique and some hands on for kids!

vendor

Dale Olson Rustic Furniture

Check out the firepit near the train depot for rustic red pine log Adirondack chairs and tables made from hand-selected logs from the north woods. Each piece of furniture has its own uniqueness and individual charm. I complete each piece with a water seal to help protect the wood for years to come.

Leif Erickson Viking Ship Restoration Exhibit


A BRIEF HISTORY from leiferiksonvikingship.com

"The Leif Erikson Ship was built in Korgen, Norway by local boat builders to replicate the type of ship sailed and the route used by the Vikings in their settlement of North America around 997 A.D. The 42 foot vessel was completed in April of 1926. Captain Gerhard Folgero and his crew of three left Bergen, Norway for North America on May 23rd of that same year.

On the voyage to Duluth, the ship stopped at the Shetland Islands, Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland and landed at St. Johns, Newfoundland on July 20, 1926. While crossing the Atlantic, the crew encountered heavy seas of hurricane proportions and became ice-locked near Greenland.

After landing in Newfoundland the crew and ship set sail for Boston, Massachusetts and arrived in August of 1926. They had traveled a distance of 6,700 miles, the greatest distance for a ship of its size in modern history, logging 10,000 miles, arriving in Duluth, Minnesota on June 23, 1927."

To learn more, visit Save Our Ship